Cranial osteopath Simon Prideaux email:
telephone: 07501 221 701
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Osteopathy for breastfeeding mothers


Osteopathy for breast soreness and mastitis is rather controversial. It may be appropriate to have the breast drained by an experienced and appropriately qualified professional or to see your GP for antibiotic treatment or indeed a Consultant at Breast unit. However, it may also be best to continue breastfeeding if you enjoy it and your baby is gaining weight well and has plenty of wet and soiled nappies.  If in doubt take the advice of a lactation consultant but be sure to check that they are appropriately qualified.

I am a trained tongue-tie practitioner and in this capacity I work closely with lactation consultants who have an interest in this field in relation to infant feeding issues. In my capacity as an Osteopath I may give postural advice to breastfeeding mothers. IF YOU ARE ATTENDING FOR TONGUE TIE ASSESSMENT PLEASE ENSURE THAT BABY IS READY FOR A FEED.

Feeding involves at least 60 muscles acting on 22 bones in the head alone and is controlled by the nerves (the "cranial nerves" or "head nerves"). Breathing and feeding are primary functions but involve a complex symphony of movements of many muscles and nerves. The muscles, bones and nerves of the head and neck are therefore as important as those of the trunk, spine and limbs.
Anything that helps the efficiency of feeding helps drain the breast more efficiently. The jury is still out on whether Osteopathy can be helpful in this regard but anecdotal evidence looks promising. Releasing tight neck muscles seems to help a lot but again purely anecdotally.

The relationship of the diad of mother and baby is complex on many levels and psychological factors obviously play a big role in the early postnatal period . I only have very basic counselling training however and no qualifications whatsoever in Psychology  nor in Psychoanalytic child development so my observations are not to be taken as professional opinion in this area and I would certainly not make any offer of help in this field other than appropriate referrals. It is best to talk openly with your GP, consultant or midwive.

It is not uncommon to feel depressed or low in mood in pregnancy and in the post natal period.
Always seek help, talk about your feelings to your GP or a mental health professional even if this seems difficult at the time.
There are effective talking therapies and other drug free treatments approved by NICE like trans-cranial magnetic stimulation.